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grant

1. Allowing something that is requested.
The United States granted permanent residence to 300,000 applicants who work in high-tech industry.


2. To accept that something is true, often before expressing that still your opinion does not change.
I'll grant you that he is not succeed it this time but I still believe in him.


3. Amount of money given by a government or other organization (called the grantor) for a particular purpose such as education or research.

Goodwill

"Goodwill" refers to a friendly or helpful attitude towards other people.
Government released all protesters being held in jail, as a goodwill gesture.

furry

An adjective that refers to something covered with fur. For instance, a furry animal.

fraud

Fraud is the crime of taking one's right, money or property by deceiving victims with an intentional perversion of truth.


Most common types of fraud include credit card fraud, insurance fraud, online sales of fake products, check fraud, charity fraud, identity fraud, and online banking fraud.

influential

An adjective that describes "having great influence" on someone or something.
It's an influential book in American literature.

Foreclosure

Foreclosure is a legal process whereby property pledged as security for a debt is sold to pay the debt in the event of a default.


:: Strict foreclosure ::
A type of judicial foreclosure, in which the court does not sell the property. Instead, the court gives title to the lender and ends the debt. However, this process also eliminates all redemption rights, deficiency judgments and any surplus compensation to the borrower. This is not commonly used.


:: Tax foreclosure ::
The sale--usually through public auction--of properties that have not paid delinquent property taxes. Most local taxing authorities assure themselves of property tax revenue by selling delinquent property taxes to investors. These investors or the taxing authority can then exercise their rights to foreclose on the property. However, property owners may be able to rescue their homes by exercising their equitable or statutory rights of redemption.


:: Deed in Lieu of foreclosure ::
A real estate deed used to convey title to a property from the current owner to the owner's lender or creditor. This deed is normally used when the current owner is in default or foreclosure proceedings. By voluntarily surrendering the property, both parties avoid the costs and delay of further legal proceedings. The lender receives title without going through the usual court and auction process; in exchange, the loan is terminated. Similar to the power of sale clause, this is a type of non-judicial foreclosure .


:: Judicial foreclosure ::
Also called foreclosure by sale, this type of foreclosure uses the courts to take the title of the collateral property away from the mortgagor. The two most common types of judicial foreclosures are judicial sales and strict foreclosures.


:: Non-Judicial foreclosure ::
A type of foreclosure that does not involve the courts. Unlike judicial foreclosures, this process usually gives the lender the title to the subject property (deed in lieu of foreclosure ) or the power to sell the property (power of sale clause).


Fiduciary

A fiduciary is a person or an organization that acts in a relationship or position of trust regarding financial transactions. For instance, agents, trustees, and attorneys.


When it is used as adjective, refers to something relating to the responsibility to take care of someone else's money or assets. For example, a fiduciary duty, fiduciary estates, a fiduciary relationship, etc.

homestead

Homestead is a house with its surrounding area of land and outbuildings, typically a farmhouse. In the past, the US government used to provide land for people, for farming purpose.
homestead


References

  • Self-sufficient one-acre homestead illustration from tpudc.com

ostensible

1. Ostensible is used to express something that seems to be true, or stated to be true, but it might not be.
He wrote three more books after his ostensible retirement.


1a) Or the person who has uttered the word has doubts about its trueness.
Her ostensible reason was to study maths, but her real reason was being close to him.


1b) Apparent; seeming, visible.
He suffered much, and not only from his ostensible enemies.

felony

Felony is a major crime that can be punished more than one year in prison. A person who has committed a felony is called a "felon". Usually, countries have a discrimination for serious crimes and less serious crimes. As in many states in the United States, where the felony/misdemeanor distinction is exist, it is classified as a misdemeanor if the punishment is less than one year.


:: More Info ::
A list of crimes that can be classified as a felony

facade

"Facade" refers to the principal face of a building, but it can be used more generally to reference any side of a building facing a street or open space. The word "facade" is derived from the French word "fa├žade", meaning front.


A facade is also something's appearance that is presented to others, especially which gives you a deceptive impressions such as a facade of a happy marriage, or facade of wealth.
They are trying to keep a facade of a happy marriage for their child.

execute

1. To carry out or perform something.
The soldier refused to execute the order.


2. To complete and give validity to a legal instrument, meaning to sign, seal, or notarize.
All joint tenants will need to execute the instrument.


3. To kill a condemned person according to law. (execution of death sentence)
He is going to be executed because of the murder he committed.

Estate

1. The ownership interest one has in real property.
2. The property left by a deceased person.
3. A large house with substantial grounds surrounding it, giving the impression of belonging to a wealthy person.

Escrow

Escrow.com is the most popular provider of online escrow services. The company was founded in 1999 and acquired in 2015 by Freelancer.com CEO Matt Barrie.


:: Escrow Process ::
1. Buyer and Seller agree to terms
2. Buyer pays Escrow.com
3. Seller ships merchandise to Buyer
4. Buyer accepts merchandise
5. Escrow.com pays the Seller


:: Escrow.com Fees ::
While you specify delivery method for your escrow transaction, you will also have the option to specify who pays the escrow fee. For a normal transaction, you can select "Buyer", "Seller", or "50% Buyer and 50% Seller".


:: More Info ::
Fee calculator - Escrow.com

Escrow

Escrow is an agreement concept between two person in which money or property is held by a third person or organization until a particular condition is fulfilled.


:: Origin ::
The word is derived from the Old French word "escroue", meaning a scrap of paper.


Erosion

Dental erosion is the loss of tooth enamel caused by chemical process or acid attack. If the enamel is worn away, the dentine underneath is emerged and it may cause sensitivity. If acidic goods are eaten/drunk insistently and no action is taken, erosion will progress, and eventually cause a pit in the tooth surface.
Erosion

Erosion

Erosion is the wearing away of land by a moving transport agent, such as water, wind, or ice. Soil, rock particles, or other dissolved elements are worn away and moved another location by a moving transport agent or gravity. Erosion is a natural process but human activities increase the probability of erosion.
Erosion

Equity

Equity is the value of a property or business after the value of liabilities have been subtracted. (Equity = Assets - Liabilities)


For instance, if someone buys a car for $30,000, yet owes $10,000 on a loan against that car, the car represents $20,000 of equity.

Entity

Something that has existence; being.
Although there are two campus in different locations, the university they are part of is a single entity.
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